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Maurice Dubois is The Dome Builder
Maurice@DomeBuilder.com
(972) 814-7391

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BOOKS
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Maurice Dubois

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Monolithic Domes

The monolithic dome is an insulated, thin-shell concrete structure that is  extremely energy efficient, strong, fire-safe, and it lasts for centuries. It is  nearly invulnerable to tornadoes, earthquakes,  hurricanes, and other natural  disasters. It is designed to withstand a Force-Five tornado. The monolithic dome is ideal for homes, apartments, bulk storage,  stadiums, schools, hockey rinks, cold storage,  motels, aircraft hangars,  recreation centers, and much more. It is the building of choice for the  discriminate buyer looking for a safe, long-lasting, energy-efficient building  at a cost that is  competitive, and often less than conventional construction.  Here’s a rundown of the construction process. You can see the building steps in  our Construction  Pictures.

Construction

The Airform
A “balloon” that we call an airform is manufactured for  us at the Monolithic Domes factory in Italy, Texas. The airform is a  nylon/polyester mesh  impregnated with PVC. The airform is extremely tough, and  it becomes the roof and exterior walls of the finished dome.

Attaching the Airform
Picture by Monolithic Dome Institute

Foundation
The monolithic dome starts with a concrete ring  foundation, reinforced with steel rebar. Vertical steel bars are embedded in the  ring and later attached to the steel  reinforcing of the dome itself. Small domes  may use an integratal floor/ring foundation. Otherwise, the floor is poured  after completion of the dome.

Airform Attachment
The airform is attached to the foundation with a  steel strap that is bolted to the ring beam or slab. It is inflated with special  fans to the shape of the completed dome. Polyurethane  foam is applied to  the interior surface of the airform. Entrance into the air-structure is made  through a double door airlock which keeps the air-pressure inside at a constant  level. Approximately three inches  of foam is applied. The foam is also the base  for attaching the steel reinforcing to the dome.

Steel Reinforcing
Steel reinforcing is attached to the foam using a  specially engineered layout of hoop (horizontal) and vertical steel rebar. Small  domes need small diameter bars with wide spacing. Large  domes require larger  bars with closer spacing. The very large domes might require two or three layers  of steel reinforcing and concrete. We can build the domes anywhere from 10 to  1,000 feet in diameter.

Concrete
Shotcrete is a special high-strength spray mix of  concrete. It is sprayed onto the interior surface of the dome. The steel rebar  is embedded in the concrete and when about three inches of shotcrete  is applied,  the monolithic dome is finished. Large domes will require considerably more  depth of steel and concrete. The blower fans are shut off after the concrete is  set.

The Completed Structure
At that point, the dome is finished, and  the inside is partitioned as needed. The dome is completely self-supporting.  There are no posts or beams. It can be left open, or partitioned.

For more information please contact Maurice  Dubois
(972) 814-7391
email:
Maurice@DomeBuilder.com

Copyright © 2005-2014 Maurice Dubois - Prices of services and buildings subject to change without notice.